Tag Archive: VMware

Feb 17 2014

VMware Tools Versions with ESX Builds (3.5u2 – 6.5 Patch 1)

Below is a list of the VMware tools versions that is released with each subsequent release of vSphere.

 

Tools Build ESX Version ESX Build
10272

6.5 Patch 01

5146846
10272 6.5 (Core)

4564106

10249 6.0 Update 3

5050593

10249 5.5 Patch 10

4722766

10249 6.0 Patch 4

4600944

10249 5.5 Patch 9

4345813

10249 6.0 Patch 3

4192238

10249 5.5 Patch 8

4179633

10246 6.0 Update 2 3620759
10240 6.0 Patch 5

3566359

10240 6.0 Patch 2

3380124

10240 5.5 Patch 7

3248547

10240 5.5 Patch 10

3565700

10240 5.5 Patch 9

3343343

9541 6.0 Patch 4

3247720

9541 6.0 Update 1

3029758

9537 6.0 Patch 1 2809209
9536 6.0 (Core) 2476743
9356 5.5 Patch 5 2668677
9355 5.5 Patch 4 2403361
9354 5.5 Patch 3 2143827
9350 5.5 Update 2 2068190
9349 5.5 Patch 2 1892794
9349 5.5 Update 1 1623387
9344 5.5 Patch 1

1474528

9344 5.5 (Core)

1331820

9226 5.1 Update 2

1483097

9221 5.1 Patch 3

1312873

9221 5.1 Patch 2

1157734

9221 5.1 Update 1

1065491

9217 5.1 Patch 1 914609
9216 5.1 (Core) 799733
8396 5.0 Patch 7

1489271

8395 5.0 Update 3

1311175

8395 5.0 Patch 6

1254542

8395 5.0 Patch 5

1024429

8394 5.0 Update 2

914586

8389 5.0 Patch 4

821926

8389 5.0 Patch 3

768111

8389 5.0 Update 1

623860

8384 5.0 Patch 02

515841

8384 5.0 (Core)

469512

8307 4.1 Patch 10
8307 4.1 Patch 09
8307 4.1 Patch 08
8306 4.1 Patch 07
8305 4.1 Patch 06
8305 4.1 Update 3
8300 4.1 Patch 05
8300 4.1 Patch 04
8300 4.1 Update 2
8295 4.1 Patch 03
8295 4.1 Update 1
8290 4.1 (Core)
8199 4.0 Patch 14
8198 4.0 Patch 13
8197 4.0 Patch 09
8196 4.0 Patch 12
8196 4.0 Patch 11
8196 4.0 Update 4
8196 4.0 Patch 10
8196 4.0 Update 3
8195 4.0 Update 2
8194 4.0 Update 1
8192 4.0 (Core)
7304 3.5 Patch 27
7304 3.5 Patch 25
7304 3.5 Patch 24
7304 3.5 Update 5
7303 3.5 Update 4
7302 3.5 Update 3
7302 3.5 Update 2

For those of you who want to know how to get a list of these, below is a simple script using PowerCLI to obtain it.

For more information from PowerCLI, refer to my Post on the subject here.

 

Dec 06 2012

Powershell and the Customisation of Numerical Results

In the event of running a powershell script and you are returned with values with an unreadable number of decimal places or in the incorrect format (not Currency, Percentage or Hex etc), you can force powershell to output the correct format of this number using some simple “conversion’ techniques.

Using the “{0:XX}” -f pre cursor to convert the chosen variable, you can tell powershell that you want the variable output in the chosen format with the selected number of decimals

If we set the variable $var = 123.1234 and then use the following precursors to decide wether we want to displayu a Number with fixed decimals (N), Currency (C) or Percentage (P) we will get the output shown:

$var =123.1234

 123.12

 $123.123

 123.1%

In the event of wanting to use the X (Hex) or D (Decimal) convertors you will need to ensure that you variable is a whole number.

$var = 123

 7B

 00123

May 18 2012

Finding CPU / Memory Maximum

I have been asked many times to try and work out the maximum performance of a VM from a CPU & Memory perspective for a number of reasons. I sat down and started plugin my way through to GUI to find the relevant information and then find out how to get the same from PowerGUI.

The below script is what I came up with which displays results as shown in the output below:

The script returns the Clusters and the VM’s in each Cluster and then outputs the relevant details; returning values for every 120 mins (2 hours) which is the default period for data saved for 1 month period (specified in script).

The output for one VM is shown below, which is the same info as we can see in the results taken from Virtual Center for the same VM.

Cluster VSI Cluster 01
VM VMName01
CPUCount 2
CPUUsage 91.88%
MEMSize 4096
MEMUsage 24.55%

CPU Usage

 

Aug 22 2011

VM Block Size & Max. Storage Size (vSphere 4)

I was working on a virtual environment recently and come across a problem with the maximum storage size for a VMDK. Upon looking further into this, I found that the block size for the datastores across our environment were mixed between, 1MB, 2MB and 4MB.

After some investigation, I found some great sites detailing the differences, best practices and recommendations. Below I will try to summarize this information for all interested.

If you run the below powerCLI script you will get a list of your Datastores, the driver version and the block size assigned…

Results…

Name Version BlocksizeMB
ABC-0211-0028-TIER1-500GB-0080 3.31 2
ABC-0212-0028-TIER1-1TB-0052 3.33 4
ABC-0213-0028-TIER1-500GB-0057 3.31 2
ABC-0214-0028-TIER1-500GB-0055 3.31 1
ABC-0215-3518-TIER2-1TB-0017 3.46 1
ABC-0215-3528-TIER1-1TB-0025 5.54 4

… from this script you can easily determine if the blocks sizes are different in your environments.

As stated above these blocks sizes determine the maximum size of your VMDK files and therefore default drives in the guest OS. This may also affect your Storage vMotion where you want to move a VMDK from one datastore to another. If the destination datastore has a smaller block size and the image is larger than the maximum volume size (above) then you will receive an error and the svMotion will not work. The block size and maximum volume size is shown below (Table 1)

Block Size Max Volume Size (VMFS-3)
1MB 256GB
2MB 512GB
4MB 1TB
8MB 2TB
Table 1: Block and Max Volume Size

In the event where you may want to resize all or all of your datastores, all data must be removed and the datatore itself must be reformatted with the new block size.

Having the larger block size will waste some disk space, but due to the number of files for each  VM (~10-15) wasting a small amount of disk space (~100MB) will far outweigh the advantaged of having Storage vMotion working effectively throughout your VMware environment.

Issues also come into play when Snapshots are left on disk for a period of time and the size of the image grows larger than the datastores maximum file size. Although the typical scenario suggests that snapshots shouldn’t be left on disk for this to occur, this can still be an issue.

In Table 2, below, the version of the file system, and from which ESX version they were formatted is shown. Where environments have been upgraded over time, you may find that you have mixed file system versions. For versions above 3.21 (ESX 3.0.0) no additional work is necessary if mixed version are found. The information presented here is only for information purposes only.

FS Version Formatted with ESX version
3.21 ESX 3.0.0
3.31 ESX 3.5.0
3.33 ESX 4.0
3.46 ESX 4.1
5.54 ESX 5.0
Table 2: FS Version & VM Version

After looking at all the problems above, the best solution to this potential problem, is to analyse all the current and future disk sizes you require and create a block size that will accommodate for these. If for instance you have a single server that will require a single disk image of 750GB, and all others only require 200GB, it would be advisable to create the datastore with a 4MB block size to allows for any potential storage vMotion you may require in the future.

Further information on these two topics can be found on the VMware knowledge base at the following URL’s:

http://bit.ly/nuHHeZ – Block Size Limitations
http://bit.ly/pgyx80 – Snapshot Size Limitations

Aug 11 2011

VM Hardware and Tool Versions – PowerCLI

We are in the process of upgrading our VM’s from a Tools and Hardware perspective. I was after the ability to find a list of VM, with the current build numbers for what was required to be upgraded and came up with the following script.. I hope this helps someone.

Results were as follows:

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