Category Archive: Development

Feb 17 2014

VMware Tools Versions with ESX Builds (3.5u2 – 6.5 Patch 1)

Below is a list of the VMware tools versions that is released with each subsequent release of vSphere.

 

Tools Build ESX Version ESX Build
10272

6.5 Patch 01

5146846
10272 6.5 (Core)

4564106

10249 6.0 Update 3

5050593

10249 5.5 Patch 10

4722766

10249 6.0 Patch 4

4600944

10249 5.5 Patch 9

4345813

10249 6.0 Patch 3

4192238

10249 5.5 Patch 8

4179633

10246 6.0 Update 2 3620759
10240 6.0 Patch 5

3566359

10240 6.0 Patch 2

3380124

10240 5.5 Patch 7

3248547

10240 5.5 Patch 10

3565700

10240 5.5 Patch 9

3343343

9541 6.0 Patch 4

3247720

9541 6.0 Update 1

3029758

9537 6.0 Patch 1 2809209
9536 6.0 (Core) 2476743
9356 5.5 Patch 5 2668677
9355 5.5 Patch 4 2403361
9354 5.5 Patch 3 2143827
9350 5.5 Update 2 2068190
9349 5.5 Patch 2 1892794
9349 5.5 Update 1 1623387
9344 5.5 Patch 1

1474528

9344 5.5 (Core)

1331820

9226 5.1 Update 2

1483097

9221 5.1 Patch 3

1312873

9221 5.1 Patch 2

1157734

9221 5.1 Update 1

1065491

9217 5.1 Patch 1 914609
9216 5.1 (Core) 799733
8396 5.0 Patch 7

1489271

8395 5.0 Update 3

1311175

8395 5.0 Patch 6

1254542

8395 5.0 Patch 5

1024429

8394 5.0 Update 2

914586

8389 5.0 Patch 4

821926

8389 5.0 Patch 3

768111

8389 5.0 Update 1

623860

8384 5.0 Patch 02

515841

8384 5.0 (Core)

469512

8307 4.1 Patch 10
8307 4.1 Patch 09
8307 4.1 Patch 08
8306 4.1 Patch 07
8305 4.1 Patch 06
8305 4.1 Update 3
8300 4.1 Patch 05
8300 4.1 Patch 04
8300 4.1 Update 2
8295 4.1 Patch 03
8295 4.1 Update 1
8290 4.1 (Core)
8199 4.0 Patch 14
8198 4.0 Patch 13
8197 4.0 Patch 09
8196 4.0 Patch 12
8196 4.0 Patch 11
8196 4.0 Update 4
8196 4.0 Patch 10
8196 4.0 Update 3
8195 4.0 Update 2
8194 4.0 Update 1
8192 4.0 (Core)
7304 3.5 Patch 27
7304 3.5 Patch 25
7304 3.5 Patch 24
7304 3.5 Update 5
7303 3.5 Update 4
7302 3.5 Update 3
7302 3.5 Update 2

For those of you who want to know how to get a list of these, below is a simple script using PowerCLI to obtain it.

For more information from PowerCLI, refer to my Post on the subject here.

 

Dec 06 2012

Powershell and the Customisation of Numerical Results

In the event of running a powershell script and you are returned with values with an unreadable number of decimal places or in the incorrect format (not Currency, Percentage or Hex etc), you can force powershell to output the correct format of this number using some simple “conversion’ techniques.

Using the “{0:XX}” -f pre cursor to convert the chosen variable, you can tell powershell that you want the variable output in the chosen format with the selected number of decimals

If we set the variable $var = 123.1234 and then use the following precursors to decide wether we want to displayu a Number with fixed decimals (N), Currency (C) or Percentage (P) we will get the output shown:

$var =123.1234

 123.12

 $123.123

 123.1%

In the event of wanting to use the X (Hex) or D (Decimal) convertors you will need to ensure that you variable is a whole number.

$var = 123

 7B

 00123

Aug 11 2011

VM Hardware and Tool Versions – PowerCLI

We are in the process of upgrading our VM’s from a Tools and Hardware perspective. I was after the ability to find a list of VM, with the current build numbers for what was required to be upgraded and came up with the following script.. I hope this helps someone.

Results were as follows:

Aug 03 2011

PowerShell Hashtables

I was poking around in PowerCLI (Powershell for VMware) trying to identify all hosts with additional information like, Memory Allocation, Cluster Ownership and Storage Assignment. This information is somewhat easy to gather normally, but I found a useful little piece of code which makes it all that more compact, yet still simple enough to read.

This code uses what is known as “hash tables” to enclose another piece of code inside the primary code block. In this example above, I use the ‘get-vmhost’ to get all the VM’s attached to vCenter, then pull some information bound to each primary VM such as which cluster they were from, the total amount of memory for each host and an array of the datastores that were assigned to each.

What this command does, it uses the ‘get-vmhost’ to gather each host, then pipe this information to the standard select statement to gather selective information. In this case, the NAME of the host is the first information, but then we see @ symbol and then {N=”Cluster”;E={get-cluster -VMHost $_}}. This creates a new Column to be displayed with the Title “Cluster”, as displayed after the N=. The E= is the command that is run, which in this case is the ‘get-cluster…’ The $_ after the -VMHost indicates that we want to use the already stored value before the pipe (|) in the current loop cycle.

The resulting output you will recieve from this piece of code is as follow:

In some instances you will find that the output it too large to fit in one line of output. In this instance, you can output the result to a .CSV file. This will give you the ability to open the file in excel (or another spreadsheet application) with all the information visible.

This piece of code will definitely help in reducing the amount of code you type, and doesn’t take that long to learn how to use it effectively.

You can find more information on splatting by googling “powershell hashtables”.

Jul 22 2011

Powershell Shortcuts

I have been doing a lot of powershell coding of late, and one things that I kept seeing in many peoples code was the two characters %, and ?.

I was a little perplexed at first in trying to understand what the code actually meant, but with some research, I now finally understand these.

If you code was originally written as

It could be re-written as with the above codes as follows

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